Tag Archive | story

‘Umar Ibn Al-Khattaab’s Son Marries A Milkmaid

One night, Caliph Umar as usual went in disguise with his companion Ibn Abbas to see the condition of the people. They strolled from one quarter to another. At last they came to a colony where poor people lived.

While passing by a small house, the Caliph heard a whispering talk within. The mother was telling her daughter that the amount of milk fetched by her for sale that day was very little. She told her that when she was young, and used to sell milk, she always mixed water with milk, and that led to considerable profit. She advised her daughter to do the same.

The girl said, “You adulterated milk, when you were not a Muslim. Now that we are Muslims, we cannot adulterate milk.” The mother said that Islam did not stand in the way of adulteration of milk. The daughter said, “Have you forgotten the Caliph’s order? He wants that the milk should not be adulterated.” The mother said, “But the Caliph has forgotten us. We are so poor, what else should we do but adulterate milk in order win bread?” The daughter said “Such a bread would not be lawful, and as a Muslim I would not do anything which is against the orders of the Caliph, and whereby other Muslims are deceived.”

The mother said, “But there is neither the Caliph nor any of his officers here to see what we do. Daughter you are still a child. Go to bed now and tomorrow I will myself mix the milk with water for you.” The girl refused to fall in with the plan of her mother. She said, “Caliph may or may not be here, but his order must be obeyed. My conscience is my Caliph. You may escape the notice of the Caliph and his officers, but how can we escape the notice of Allah and our own conscience.” Thereupon the mother remained quiet. The lamp was extinguished and the mother and the daughter went to sleep.

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The Damage Has Already Been Done – Story Of A Bad Tempered Boy

There once was a little boy who had a bad temper. His father gave him a bag of nails and told him that every time he lost his temper, he must hammer a nail into the back of the fence.

The first day the boy had driven 37 nails into the fence. Over the next few weeks, as he learned to control his anger, the number of nails hammered daily gradually dwindled down. He discovered it was easier to hold his temper than to drive those nails into the fence.

Finally, the day came when the boy didn’t lose his temper at all. He told his father about it and the father suggested that the boy now pull out one nail for each day that he was able to hold his temper!

The days passed and the young boy was finally able to tell his father that all the nails were gone. The father took his son by the hand and led him to the fence He said, “You have done well, my son, but look at the holes in the fence. The fence will never be the same. When you say things in anger, they leave a scar just like this one. You can put a knife in a man and draw it out. It won’t matter how many times you say “I’m sorry”, the wound is still there. A verbal wound is as bad as a physical one.

{{MashaaAllaah I had to put this on. Like I always say, a simple “Sorry” doesn’t really mean much, one needs to show that he or she is sorry for his past actions.}}

The Unknown Deceased’s Prayer

One day, Ibbaan Ibn Saaleh left the company of Anas Ibn Maalik (ra) and began to walk in th emarketplace, when suddenly, four men carrying a bier with a corpse on it passed by.

Ibbaan then exclaimed, “Strange indeed! The marketplaces of Basrah are filled with people, yet only four people are following this funeral procession; verily I wioll make it five.

Before they reached the graveyard, and when it was time to pray over the deceased, Ibbaan asked the others, “Who among you is the gardian (or relative) of the deceased, so that he can led the funeral prayer?

The others answered in unison, “In terms of closeness to the deceased, we are all equal. So you (i.e., Ibbaan) lead the prayer.

They prayed over the deceased, finished their march to the graveyard, and buried the corpse. When all was said and done, Ibbaan asked, “I ask you by Allaah, tell me the truth about this dead person (we just buried).

They said, “None of us knows the story of this dead person; we are simply workers; a woman paid us to carry the corpse (and to bury it).

Ibbaan turned around and saw a woman approaching the grave they had just dug; she sat over the grave for a while and then stood up, laughing. After going up to her, Ibbaan said, “By Allaah, this is strange indeed! A woman laughing over the grave of her deceased (relative or friend).

Why are you praying into that which does not concern you?” the woman said.

Inform me (about what just happened),” insisted Ibbaan. “Indeed I am Ibbaan, servant of Anas Bin Maalik (ra), who was the servant of the Messenger of Allaah.

Had it not been for the fact that you are who you are, O Ibbaan, I would never have told you my story. The deceased (in the grave) is my son. He was a reckless person who did wrong to his own self. Last night he became very sick, and so he called me to him. When I went to him, he requested (as a dying man) that I follow all his instructions. I told him to say anything, and that I would comply with his wishes. he told me not to inform anyone about his death.

He then said, “When they place me into the grave, raise your hands to Allaah, and invoke Him to forgive me. And say; ‘O my God, I am indeed pleased with him, so You too be pleased with him.’ O my mother, stand up now, place your foot on my face, and say; ‘This is the reward of one who disobeys Allaah ‘Azza wa Jall (the Possessor of might and majesty).’

I did as he asked, and by the time I had lifted my foot from his face, he was dead. I then hired these four men to wash the corpse, enshroud it, carry it to its grave, and then to bury it. When they walked away, I approached the grave, raised my hands and said, ‘O Most Merciful of the merciful ones, O Most Generous of the generous ones, You indeed know our secret and open realities; indeed You know what is apparent and what is hidden. Indeed my sinning, erring son invoked You by dint of his poor humble mother being pleased with him. Indeed I am pleased with him, so You too be pleased with him.’ I then heard a voice from inside of the grave say to me, ‘Go, my mother, for I have returned to the Most Generous Lord, Who has indeed forgiven my sins.’ That is what made me laugh and walk away in such a happy state.

[Taken from “Glimpses Of The Lives Of Righteous People”, Darussalam publishing, Pp. 27-29, quoting from “Al-Mawaa’iz Wal-Majaalis”, p. 194-195]

The Story Of Umm Habibah; A Loyal Wife By All Means

Umm Habibah was married to Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) through the proxy of the Emperor of Abyssinia. She was the daughter of the chief of Makkah.

Her name was Ramlah bint Abi Sufyan. She was born 25 years before the Hijrah. Being the daughter of a prominent merchant and leader of her people, Umm Habibah enjoyed a very easy and comfortable life.

She — herself one of the few literate Arabs at the time — was married to a wealthy Makkan who was versed in the knowledge of major religions of his time. Despite the fierce resistance the Makkan polytheists showed to Islam and the fact that her own parents were among the arch enemies of Islam, Umm Habibah was one of the early converts to Islam.

Out of fear for his followers, Prophet Muhammad advised them to emigrate to Abyssinia on the Western Arabian side of the Red Sea that separated the Peninsula from Africa.

Umm Habibah was one of the emigrants along with her husband, Ubaidullah ibn Jahsh. To her misfortune the husband, for some reason or another, apostatized and took to drinking.

Thus, Umm Habibah had to suffer not only separation from her home and family at Makkah, but she also suffered alienation from a beloved husband. Yet, as a courageous Muslim, she bore all these difficulties with patience and perseverance, finding solace in the freedom she enjoyed along with the other emigrants in Abyssinia under the protection of Emperor Negus who was an open-minded Christian.

Parenthetically, we may add that according to Muslim historians the Emperor of Abyssinia (known today as Ethiopia) did convert at a later date to Islam in secrecy, out of admiration for Islam and its teachings, which explains why Prophet Muhammad asked the companions to pray for him upon his death.

During the year of truce between the Muslims and the Makkan polytheists, Prophet Muhammad, sent messages to the heads of the big powers of the time, Khosrau of Persia, the Byzantine emperor and the ruler of Abyssinia.

Along with the missive calling Negus to Islam, the Prophet asked him to act proxy for him in the marriage to Umm Habibah. For Prophet Muhammad realized the agony she was going through in that far and strange land.

The best consolation he could offer her was honoring her by marriage to him. Politically this was also a tactful act, because through marriage to Umm Habibah, the Prophet would be an in-law to Abu Sufyan, the leading antagonist of Islam, which would, help in softening his hostile attitude.

Thus, Umm Habibah was honored not only by being asked in marriage to the Prophet of Islam, but she was also honored by having the Emperor of Abyssinia himself proxy suitor.

Upon hearing of the proposal, Umm Habibah appointed a Companion to represent her and act as guardian. The emperor celebrated the occasion on behalf of the Prophet by giving a feast to the Muslim emigrants who attended the wedding.

It was sometime later that Umm Habibah managed to go to Madinah to her husband along with the other Muslim emigrants led by a cousin of the Prophet, Jafar ibn Abi Talib.

At the house of the Prophet, Umm Habibah faced another important test of her faith, when she came face to face with her father Abu Sufyan who was (as mentioned earlier) the leader of the enemies of Islam.

For, when some allies of Quraish broke the terms of the peace truce with Prophet Muhammad, with the implicit approval of the people of Quraish, Abu Sufyan hurried to Madinah to cover up for the treacherous act.

The first person that came to his mind was certainly his daughter Umm Habibah, since she was the wife of Prophet Muhammad. He hoped she would intercede for him with her husband.

Upon entering his daughter’s room Abu Sufyan wanted to sit on the Prophet’s mattress. Umm Habibah quickly folded the mattress. He was surprised and asked:

Are you trying to keep me away from the mattress or keep the mattress away from me?

Umm Habibah answered: “It is the mattress of the Messenger of God. You are a disbeliever and unclean. I did not want you to sit on the Messenger of God’s mattress,

He said: “By God, something has gone wrong with you.

She answered: “On the contrary, God has guided me to Islam. Father, you are the master and leader of Quraish. How can you sit on it as you have not joined Islam and are still worshipping useless stones?

The mission proved a failure for Abu Sufyan. But for Umm Habibah, she passed another difficult test. She had to choose between loyalty to her faith and love for her father whom she had not seen for many long years. She chose to take sides with her faith.

Thus, when Umm Habibah died 44 years after the Hijrah, her memory keeps living in the minds and hearts of millions of Muslims.

Source

How To Keep Your Marriage In tact: Through Obedience To Allaah

Below is a story I read in Gems And Jewels, Pp. 257-258. Beautiful, sad and a nice lesson gained…

How To Keep Your Marriage In tact: Through Obedience To Allaah

My story is plain enough, nothing strikingly poignant about it, but I tell you that perhaps you can learn from my mistake:

My marriage began as a very happy union between my husband and myself. We weren’t rich, but we were content with what we had, and we had a daughter whom we both loved dearly.

In the early stages of our marriage, we would put our daughter to sleep, and we would pray, glorify Allaah, and recite the Qur’aan.

One day, we checked our savings and realized that we had saved a considerable sum of money, and so I suggested to my husband that we should buy interest bearing shares, the proceeds of which we could definitely use to help our daughter later on in life.

We invested all that we had, including all of the money that I made from selling all of my jewelry. After only a short time passed, the prices of the shares plunged, we went bankrupt, and we were left with many debts. We came to learn the hard way that:

Allaah will destroy riba (usury) and will give increase for sadaqaat (deeds of charity, ominous, etc.).” [Qur’aan 2:276]

During one of the difficult nights that followed, I got into a huge argument with my husband and demanded that he divorce me. He then screamed out, “You are divorced from me!!! You are divorced from me!!!”

Both my child and I cried, and through the many tears, it was this that was constantly going through my mind: We were joined together through obedience to Allaah, and we then became separated through disobedience to Him.

By Allaah They Have Lied

Sa’d bin Ibraheem said:

Zinneerah was a roman slave and became a muslimah. The mushrikeen tortured her until she lost her sight because of the severe torture.

The mushrikeen said “The laat and ‘uzzah took her sight”.

She said, “I disbelieve in al-laat wal ‘uzzah”, and Allaah returned back her sight.

In another narration:

Abu Bakr Radiyallaahu anhu freed zinneerah from slavery and she lost her sight when she was freed. Quraish said: “its only laat and ‘uzzah that took her sight”.

She said, “By Allaah they have lied, al-laat wal ‘uzzah neither harm or benefit“, and Allaah returned back her sight.

[‘Al-‘Isaabah fee tamyeez as-Sahaabah’, by Ibn hajr al-‘Asqalaani]

A Mother’s True Love

Abu Hurairah related that Allaah’s Messenger said;

There were two women and each of them had a son. A wolf came and took away the son of one of them. One said to the other, “It took away your son.” And the other said, “No, it took away your son.

So they went to Dawood (David) for judgement, and he ruled for the older of the two. Then they went to Sulaymaan Ibn Dawood (Solomon, the son of David) and informed him of what happened.

He said, “Bring to me a knife and I will cut him in two.

The younger of the two women said, “Do not do so, may Allaah have mercy on you, for he is her son.

Then Sulaymaan (knowing the love of a mother), ruled for the younger of the two women.

[Bukhaari & Muslim]

Young. British. Female. Muslim.

Thousands of young British women living in the UK decide to convert to Islam – here are some of their stories

It’s a controversial time for British women to be wearing the hijab, the basic Muslim headscarf. Last month, Belgium became the first European country to pass legislation to ban the burka (the most concealing of Islamic veils), calling it a “threat” to female dignity, while France looks poised to follow suit. In Italy earlier this month, a Muslim woman was fined €500 (£430) for wearing the Islamic veil outside a post office.

And yet, while less than 2 per cent of the population now attends a Church of England service every week, the number of female converts to Islam is on the rise. At the London Central Mosque in Regent’s Park, women account for roughly two thirds of the “New Muslims” who make their official declarations of faith there – and most of them are under the age of 30.

Conversion statistics are frustratingly patchy, but at the time of the 2001 Census, there were at least 30,000 British Muslim converts in the UK. According to Kevin Brice, of the Centre for Migration Policy Research, Swansea University, this number may now be closer to 50,000 – and the majority are women. “Basic analysis shows that increasing numbers of young, university-educated women in their twenties and thirties are converting to Islam,” confirms Brice.

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One Apple Leads To His Marriage. A Beautiful Story!

One Apple Leads To His Marriage. A Beautiful Story!

* Please do read this – A wonderful story indeed *

One of our pious predecessors, Thabit Bin Nu’man, was hungry and tired as he was passing through a garden that bordered a river. He was so hungry that he could hear his stomach growling, and so his eyes became fixed on the fruits he saw on the various trees of the garden. In a fit of desperation, he forgot himself and extended his hand to an apple that was within reach. He ate half of it and then drank water from the river. But then he became overcome with guilt, despite the fact that he had only eaten because of dire need.

He said to himself, “Woe unto me! How can I eat someone else’s fruits without his permission? I make it binding upon myself not to leave this place until I find the owner of this garden and ask him to forgive me for having eaten one of his apples.

After a brief search, he found the owner’s house. He knocked on the door and the owner of the garden came out and asked him what he wanted.

Thabit Bin Nu’man said, “I entered your garden that borders the river, and I took this apple and ate half of it. Then I remembered it does not belong to me, and so I ask you now to excuse me for having eaten it and to forgive me for my mistake.

The man said, “On one condition only I will forgive you for your mistake.

Thabit Bin Nu’man asked, “And what is that condition?

He said, “That you marry my daughter.

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The Story Of Umm Habibah; A Loyal Wife By All Means

The Story Of Umm Habibah; A Loyal Wife By All Means

Umm Habibah was married to Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) through the proxy of the Emperor of Abyssinia. She was the daughter of the chief of Makkah.

Her name was Ramlah bint Abi Sufyan. She was born 25 years before the Hijrah. Being the daughter of a prominent merchant and leader of her people, Umm Habibah enjoyed a very easy and comfortable life.

She — herself one of the few literate Arabs at the time — was married to a wealthy Makkan who was versed in the knowledge of major religions of his time. Despite the fierce resistance the Makkan polytheists showed to Islam and the fact that her own parents were among the arch enemies of Islam, Umm Habibah was one of the early converts to Islam.

Out of fear for his followers, Prophet Muhammad advised them to emigrate to Abyssinia on the Western Arabian side of the Red Sea that separated the Peninsula from Africa.

Umm Habibah was one of the emigrants along with her husband, Ubaidullah ibn Jahsh. To her misfortune the husband, for some reason or another, apostatized and took to drinking.

Thus, Umm Habibah had to suffer not only separation from her home and family at Makkah, but she also suffered alienation from a beloved husband. Yet, as a courageous Muslim, she bore all these difficulties with patience and perseverance, finding solace in the freedom she enjoyed along with the other emigrants in Abyssinia under the protection of Emperor Negus who was an open-minded Christian.

Parenthetically, we may add that according to Muslim historians the Emperor of Abyssinia (known today as Ethiopia) did convert at a later date to Islam in secrecy, out of admiration for Islam and its teachings, which explains why Prophet Muhammad asked the companions to pray for him upon his death.

During the year of truce between the Muslims and the Makkan polytheists, Prophet Muhammad, sent messages to the heads of the big powers of the time, Khosrau of Persia, the Byzantine emperor and the ruler of Abyssinia.

Along with the missive calling Negus to Islam, the Prophet asked him to act proxy for him in the marriage to Umm Habibah. For Prophet Muhammad realized the agony she was going through in that far and strange land.

Continue reading