Tag Archive | mother

‘Umar Ibn Al-Khattaab’s Son Marries A Milkmaid

One night, Caliph Umar as usual went in disguise with his companion Ibn Abbas to see the condition of the people. They strolled from one quarter to another. At last they came to a colony where poor people lived.

While passing by a small house, the Caliph heard a whispering talk within. The mother was telling her daughter that the amount of milk fetched by her for sale that day was very little. She told her that when she was young, and used to sell milk, she always mixed water with milk, and that led to considerable profit. She advised her daughter to do the same.

The girl said, “You adulterated milk, when you were not a Muslim. Now that we are Muslims, we cannot adulterate milk.” The mother said that Islam did not stand in the way of adulteration of milk. The daughter said, “Have you forgotten the Caliph’s order? He wants that the milk should not be adulterated.” The mother said, “But the Caliph has forgotten us. We are so poor, what else should we do but adulterate milk in order win bread?” The daughter said “Such a bread would not be lawful, and as a Muslim I would not do anything which is against the orders of the Caliph, and whereby other Muslims are deceived.”

The mother said, “But there is neither the Caliph nor any of his officers here to see what we do. Daughter you are still a child. Go to bed now and tomorrow I will myself mix the milk with water for you.” The girl refused to fall in with the plan of her mother. She said, “Caliph may or may not be here, but his order must be obeyed. My conscience is my Caliph. You may escape the notice of the Caliph and his officers, but how can we escape the notice of Allah and our own conscience.” Thereupon the mother remained quiet. The lamp was extinguished and the mother and the daughter went to sleep.

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Every Mother Is A Da’ee, By Ibn ‘Uthaymeen

A woman first and foremost needs to be righteous herself, so that she can be a good example for her daughters…

A woman should train her children properly, for her children represent the men and women of the future. In the earliest stages of their development, it is the mothers that human beings learn from. If she is a good mother, good in her manners and dealings and good in the way she brings up her children, then those children will take after her and contribute positively to the betterment of society.

Every mother, then, must dedicate herself to training her children, and if she cannot undertake their training on her own, then their father or another guardian – for example, a brother or uncle, if their father is dead – should help her to raise them.

A woman should not yield to difficult circumstances, feeling that she cannot change her situation or her family’s situation for the better.

[The Islaamic Awakening, by Ibn ‘Uthaymeen, Pp. 223 & 229]

The Mother Of Aboo ‘Aasim (122-212H) Was Just 12yrs Old!

Aboo ‘Aasim was born in 122H – and his mother was twelve years old at the time!

Those who he narrated from include: Imaam Maalik, Sufyaan amongst others.

Those who narrate from him include: Imaam Bukhaaree (And Aboo ‘Aasim was the most senior and most excellent of his shaykhs), Ishaaq Ibn raahawaih, ‘Alee Ibn Al-Madeenee, Imam Ahmad, Adh-Dhuhlee, amongst others.

Imaam Bukhaaree said:

“I heard Aboo ‘Aasim say, ‘Since I have known backbiting to be forbidden, I have never backbitten anyone.’ “

Aboo ‘Aasim said:

“Whoever seeks hadeeth has sought the highest of affairs, so he must be the best of the people.

He never narrated except from memory, he died on the 14th of Dhul Hijjah 212H

[Siyaar A’laamun Nubulaa, Vol. 9, Pp. 480-485]

The Unknown Deceased’s Prayer

One day, Ibbaan Ibn Saaleh left the company of Anas Ibn Maalik (ra) and began to walk in th emarketplace, when suddenly, four men carrying a bier with a corpse on it passed by.

Ibbaan then exclaimed, “Strange indeed! The marketplaces of Basrah are filled with people, yet only four people are following this funeral procession; verily I wioll make it five.

Before they reached the graveyard, and when it was time to pray over the deceased, Ibbaan asked the others, “Who among you is the gardian (or relative) of the deceased, so that he can led the funeral prayer?

The others answered in unison, “In terms of closeness to the deceased, we are all equal. So you (i.e., Ibbaan) lead the prayer.

They prayed over the deceased, finished their march to the graveyard, and buried the corpse. When all was said and done, Ibbaan asked, “I ask you by Allaah, tell me the truth about this dead person (we just buried).

They said, “None of us knows the story of this dead person; we are simply workers; a woman paid us to carry the corpse (and to bury it).

Ibbaan turned around and saw a woman approaching the grave they had just dug; she sat over the grave for a while and then stood up, laughing. After going up to her, Ibbaan said, “By Allaah, this is strange indeed! A woman laughing over the grave of her deceased (relative or friend).

Why are you praying into that which does not concern you?” the woman said.

Inform me (about what just happened),” insisted Ibbaan. “Indeed I am Ibbaan, servant of Anas Bin Maalik (ra), who was the servant of the Messenger of Allaah.

Had it not been for the fact that you are who you are, O Ibbaan, I would never have told you my story. The deceased (in the grave) is my son. He was a reckless person who did wrong to his own self. Last night he became very sick, and so he called me to him. When I went to him, he requested (as a dying man) that I follow all his instructions. I told him to say anything, and that I would comply with his wishes. he told me not to inform anyone about his death.

He then said, “When they place me into the grave, raise your hands to Allaah, and invoke Him to forgive me. And say; ‘O my God, I am indeed pleased with him, so You too be pleased with him.’ O my mother, stand up now, place your foot on my face, and say; ‘This is the reward of one who disobeys Allaah ‘Azza wa Jall (the Possessor of might and majesty).’

I did as he asked, and by the time I had lifted my foot from his face, he was dead. I then hired these four men to wash the corpse, enshroud it, carry it to its grave, and then to bury it. When they walked away, I approached the grave, raised my hands and said, ‘O Most Merciful of the merciful ones, O Most Generous of the generous ones, You indeed know our secret and open realities; indeed You know what is apparent and what is hidden. Indeed my sinning, erring son invoked You by dint of his poor humble mother being pleased with him. Indeed I am pleased with him, so You too be pleased with him.’ I then heard a voice from inside of the grave say to me, ‘Go, my mother, for I have returned to the Most Generous Lord, Who has indeed forgiven my sins.’ That is what made me laugh and walk away in such a happy state.

[Taken from “Glimpses Of The Lives Of Righteous People”, Darussalam publishing, Pp. 27-29, quoting from “Al-Mawaa’iz Wal-Majaalis”, p. 194-195]

A Mother’s Love

Another interesting something I found hidden in the world of the internet:

(Whether its true or not, Allaahu ‘alam, most probably a fabricated story, however an interesting read)

There was this young man about twenty years old named Jamal. Jamal was approached by a salesman, Adam, who offered Jamal one hundred thousand dollars (or dinars) for his mother’s heart.

Jamal, with dollar signs in his eyes and greed in his heart, took the offer to be literal and went home right away and with a dagger claimed the life of his mother and tore out her heart and hurriedly started back towards the marketplace to find the salesman. On his way to the marketplace, Jamal tripped on some pebbles and as he fell down he dropped his mother’s heart and it got all dirty with the dust from the ground. After he fell, a soft voice came from within the heart and said: “O my son, are you alright?

Startled, Jamal realized what he had done and started crying. He cried so much that the tears from his eyes rolled down his cheeks and with those tears the dirt on the heart was wiped clean. Jamal, now desperate, wanted a way out of the major sin he had just committed.

He picked up his dagger and pulled it up and was about to take his own life. Suddenly, the same soft voice came out a second time from the heart. This time it stated: “O my son, do not kill me twice.

This story definitely symbolizes a mother’s love for her child. The Quran and Sunnah show the importance of one’s parents.

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A Mother – A Childs First Love

A mother asked her family doctor; “Why don’t women of this generation find enough milk to breast-feed their children?

The doctor remained silent for  moment, and then said; “Imagine cows that are in the field that are constantly driven at high speeds. Each night, when they return to the barnyard, they will not be able to give forth milk. Madame, such is the state of mothers today!

Moral Of The Story:

yes, such is the state of mothers today. A mother in these times leaves home in the morning just as men do, striving with all their strength, preserving through the heat of the sun or through the cold of the winter, toiling – either of her own accord or under coercion, because at the end of the day (or month) she needs her paycheck.

How will the woman just described be able to find milk in her breasts in order to suckle her babies? Furthermore, how can she find time to look after her children? To bestow upon them her love? To give them her full attention?

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22 Tips For Parents

What does it take for parents to get a teen to become a practicing Muslim?

Sound Vision has talked to parents, Imams, activists and Muslims who have grown up in the West to ask what are some practical things parents can do to help Muslim teens maintain their Deen. These are some of their suggestions:

Tip #1: Take parenting more seriously than you would a full-time job

This means both parents must understand their children are a trust from Allah, and He will ask how they were raised. If the children do not grow up practicing Islam because of their parents’ negligence, it is not going to be pretty in this life or the next.

Tip #2:Reduce or change work hours and exchange them for time with the family

It is better to have one full-time job, fewer luxuries in the house (i.e. more cars, expensive clothes, a bigger, fancier home) and more time with the family, than many material things and absent parents. This goes for mothers AND fathers. Parents can’t instill values in their children if they just aren’t there, period. Quit that extra job on the weekends or in the evenings and instead drive the kids to the mosque for Halaqas and activities instead. Or consider switching shifts at work so that you’re home when the kids are.

Tip #3: Read the Quran, understanding its meaning, for five minutes every day

Just five minutes. Whether it’s in the car during a traffic jam, early morning after Fajr, or right before you go to bed, read the Quran with a translation and/or Tafseer. Then watch the snowball effect. You will, Insha Allah, reconnect with Allah, and in the long run, develop into a role model helping your whole family, not just your teen, reconnect with Him too.

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