Tag Archive | iran

Mutah is Haraam

Shia Claims:

Most Shia of today have a hard time self-justifying the concept of Mutah. In fact, it is a point which causes many of them to doubt their faith, and rightfully so. It is sad that the Shia elders use false rhetoric to demand that their followers reject logic and morality, to instead blindly accept the idea that prostitution is part of Islam. These Shia leaders will make emphatic arguments such as this:

“The Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم) did Mutah, and he not only allowed it, but actively encouraged it! We must obey the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم) in all matters, and we cannot disagree with him based on our own opinions. If the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم) did it, then surely we should do it. Whoever says that Mutah is disgusting is saying that the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم) is disgusting.”

And some Shia will even go a step further and falsely claim:

“Mutah is even allowed in Sunni Hadith. The only reason Sunnis do not do Mutah is because the second Caliph, Umar, banned Mutah against the orders of the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم).” Then, the Shia will procure Sunni Hadith which say that the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم) allowed Mutah.”

Mutah Forbidden in Stages

The reality is that Mutah was permissible in the early days of Islam, but was eventually banned categorically by the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم).

This is very similar to wine, which was at first permissible in Islam, and it was only later in time that the Prophet (صلّى الله عليه وآله وسلّم) forbade it. The prohibitions against wine were expounded slowly over a period of time. In the beginning, drinking wine was permissible and many of the Sahabah did it.

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The Mutah Pimps

Adapted from an article written by Dr. Donna M. Hughes who is a Professor and holds the Carlson Endowed Chair in Women’s Studies at the University of Rhode Island.

According to an official source in Tehran, there has been a 635% increase in the number of teenage girls in prostitution, or rather, Mutah. The magnitude of this statistic conveys how rapidly this form of abuse has grown. In Tehran, there are an estimated 84,000 women and girls in prostitution, many of them are on the streets, others are in the 250 brothels that reportedly operate in the city. The trade is also international: thousands of Iranian women and girls have been been “contracted in Mutah” to foreigners abroad. The head of Iran’s Interpol bureau believes that the Mutah trade is one of the most profitable activities in Iran today.

High unemployment – 28% for youth 15-29 years of age and 43% for women 15-20 years of age – is a serious factor in driving restless youth to accept Mutah. The Mutah “pimps” take advantage of any opportunity in which women and children are vulnerable. For example, following the recent earthquake in Bam, orphaned girls have been contracted out in Tehran where Iranian and foreign traders meet.

Popular destinations for girls sent for Mutah are the Arab countries in the Persian Gulf. According to the head of the Tehran province judiciary, Mutah traffickers target girls between 13 and 17, although there are reports of some girls as young as 8 and 10, to send to Arab countries. The number of Iranian women and girls who are deported from Persian Gulf countries indicates the magnitude of the trade.

Police have uncovered a number of Mutah rings operating from Tehran that have sold girls to France, Britain, Turkey, as well. One network based in Turkey bought smuggled Iranian women and girls, gave them fake passports, and transported them to European and Persian Gulf countries. In one case, a 16-year-old girl was smuggled to Turkey, and then sold in Mutah to a 58-year-old European national for $20,000.

In the northeastern Iranian province of Khorasan, local police report that girls are being sold in Mutah to Pakistani men. The Pakistani men temporarily marry the girls, ranging in age from 12 to 20; they are also sent to Mutah brothels called “Kharabat” in Pakistan. One network was caught contacting poor families around Mashad and offering to temporary marry girls. The girls were then taken through Afghanistan to Pakistan where they were sent to Mutah brothels to work. In the southeastern border province of Sistan Baluchestan, thousands of Iranian girls reportedly have been sold in Mutah to Afghani men. Their final destinations are unknown.

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